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Fishing Advice http://alwaysanadventure.com Thu, 28 May 2015 06:43:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 90609000 Our Boat http://alwaysanadventure.com/product-reviews/boat/ http://alwaysanadventure.com/product-reviews/boat/#respond Sun, 13 Jul 2014 19:48:53 +0000 http://www.alwaysanadventure.com/?p=253 We had an 18 foot sailfish for about 5 years. We bought it from a coast guard mechanic who had taken good care of it and we always kept it well serviced as well. We would run it through the local rivers and out to about 30 miles off-shore to fish the local reefs. As […]

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We had an 18 foot sailfish for about 5 years. We bought it from a coast guard mechanic who had taken good care of it and we always kept it well serviced as well. We would run it through the local rivers and out to about 30 miles off-shore to fish the local reefs. As the boat got older, we started to get cautious about taking it out, as even with good care, the boat was getting older and anything out of the ordinary would cause us to hesitate taking it where we wanted to go.

Last year, we traded it in and bought a new 23’ Tidewater Adventure Center console. The boat has a single Yamaha 250 horse motor on the back, and we spent the extra for the Yamaha digital gauges verses the analog gauges that would have been the base option. The boat holds 103 gallons of fuel, which is more than enough for most days on the water. We live by the rule of 1/3’s when it comes to the boat in that we always top it off before heading out and always come back to the dock with a third of a tank of gas, so we really consider 70 gallons to be our capacity. I’ve been very impressed with the accuracy of the digital gauges and have not yet found them to be off by more than a gallon on any trip regardless of the fuel usage to this point. We only run ethanol free or marine grade fuel in the boat.

The boat itself is nicely equipped with a hard fiberglass T-top with an enclosure for the VHF radio up top. We run the dual battery setup and alternate batteries each trip. We opted out of the standard fresh water wash down option and the head beneath the center console. We use this area for dry storage instead. We didn’t want the hassle of dealing with a porta potty and keeping the fresh water “fresh” that comes with those options.

The T-top has two spreader lights to aft that light up the back of the boat adequately and one spreader light to the forward. There are courtesy lights along the sides of the console and the overhead light shines white or red. We had two underwater lights installed to either side of the engine that can either shine blue, white or a combination of both.

There is a nice sized round baitwell at the back corner of the boat with a courtesy light inside it. The opposite side of the boat has a pass through with a ladder for easy boarding from the water. There is some storage beneath the front console seat and two nice storage areas beneath the forward seats. All of these are dry storage, but they do drain overboard. None of them are insulated well though, if they are filled with ice at the beginning of the day, there will be ice left in them at the end of the day, but not a lot.

We had one of the Garmin 700 series fish finder / GPS maps installed as well as a radar dome and we had a through hull transducer installed. We’ve been very happy with the performance of all of these components. We had all of them installed by a local marine electronics company, Maricom and they came to right to our house to do the install in the yard.  They also installed the stereo, the VHF radio and Antenna and the Sirius satellite weather receiver dome.

Breaking in the new motor for the first 100 hours was rough. Much like other things, we had differing advice as to how to break it in properly with some talking about not keeping it at one speed for too long and babying it to others suggesting to just run it like we’re going to run it and not baby it or it would never really break in. We did a little of both in the end (Ann was a little more aggressive with it than I tended to be). I just wanted to get through the process to get the first 100 hour service behind us and head off shore. Finally, that day arrived and off we went.

We’ve had the boat out as far as the Deli ledge here in Savannah, which is just shy of the gulf stream on a few occasions. In savannah, you pick your days carefully when going to the gulf stream. Most of the time, we’ll head out to the Snapper banks or the local towers off the coast and either bottom fish or troll, depending on what we feel we are after for the day. We haven’t gotten caught in any storms in this boat as yet, partly just from the days we choose to go out and partly due to the satellite and radar on those days when the isolated storms come up.

The boat has performed well and we are very happy with it. We’re still learning how to make the best use of the trim tabs, but the boat really runs nice. It has a very high bow with a big Carolina flare to it that pushes the water out and away from the boat. The largest issue I’ve found with the boat is that the back of my neck is generally pretty stiff at the end of the day from trying to see over the bow, but I’ll take that for a good day of fishing.

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Stinger hooks http://alwaysanadventure.com/product-reviews/stinger-hooks/ http://alwaysanadventure.com/product-reviews/stinger-hooks/#respond Wed, 02 Jul 2014 23:41:19 +0000 http://www.alwaysanadventure.com/?p=257 There has been twice now that I have learned the true meaning behind “stinger hooks.” The first time, my wife caught a big Spanish mackerel on a butterfly jig and it wriggled free as I was trying to get the hook out. As it fell out of my hand, the stinger hook caught the palm […]

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There has been twice now that I have learned the true meaning behind “stinger hooks.” The first time, my wife caught a big Spanish mackerel on a butterfly jig and it wriggled free as I was trying to get the hook out. As it fell out of my hand, the stinger hook caught the palm of my hand….yep… it stung. We had just travelled for 3 hours to get out to where we wanted to fish when this happened. We had a heck of a time trying to get the hook out and I surely wasn’t ready to give up on fishing for the day, so we tried and tried and eventually were able to get the hook out (there is a pretty good sized barb on a size 5/0 hook) We fished the remainder of the day and caught a lot of fish. It surely was an adventure.

On the second occasion I was out with my son Coty and we were about 50 miles off shore at one of the naval towers off of Georgia’s coast when he caught an Amberjack. IT was probably about a 35 pound Amberjack and he caught it on a Yo-Zu-Ri lure with two treble hooks. This time, I tried to remove the hook and the Amberjack shook his head while on the deck of the boat. When he did, he drove one of the trebles deep into my thumb. Being that this was a very large and very “green” fish, I didn’t wait for him to thrash around again. This time I yanked the hook out with a large portion of the flesh of my thumb attached to the barb as I figured I was going to lose the whole thing if I didn’t. I can tell you that it stung a little.

Lesson, Exercise a lot of caution when trying to remove a hook that has a stinger hook attached.

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Winni Derby http://alwaysanadventure.com/uncategorized/winnie-derby/ http://alwaysanadventure.com/uncategorized/winnie-derby/#respond Fri, 16 May 2014 23:34:07 +0000 http://www.alwaysanadventure.com/?p=3370 The Winni Derby The Winni Derby kicks off this weekend on New Hampshire’s Lake Winnipesaukee. I wish all participants the best. My sister and my son were going to compete this year, but my son got held up in upstate New York, which will probably put my sister out of it due to the minimum […]

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The Winni Derby

The Winni Derby kicks off this weekend on New Hampshire’s Lake Winnipesaukee. I wish all participants the best. My sister and my son were going to compete this year, but my son got held up in upstate New York, which will probably put my sister out of it due to the minimum participant per boat requirement.

There will be a lot of streamer fishermen out there and they work well. The Grey Ghost and Winnipesaukee Smelt come to mind. I always found the best lure to be the laker taker. It is made by the same manufacturer that makes the Swedish pimple and although I don’t offer these on our site, I’ll say they are great lures for lakers and landlocked Salmon. They work best at speeds less than 3 miles per hour due to there light weight and shape. I always found the silver with chartreuse stripe and red trailer to work best for lake trout when bumping the bottom with the downrigger ball and the silver with pink and chartreuse or red trailer within the upper 50 foot of the water column for Salmon.

The boat owner may get a little irritated with bumping the downrigger ball off the bottom, but lead core line behind the ball would remedy that. I always found the best lake trout bite to be coming out of Alton bay into the main lake near Rattlesnake Island when it dropped from 90′ to 120′ to bump the bottom. The best Salmon bite seemed to always be in front of Rattlesnake. There was a good Salmon bite inside of Alton bay, but they were usually small.

If you get into a nice 18 to 21 inch laker or salmon they probably won’t be big enough to place in the derby, but they are great eating. I always liked to keep them alive as long as possible (this also preserves the weight and adds those precious ounces for the win). I’d get them home still alive. Then I’d head them, gut them and scale them. I would lay down some foil and put a half a stick of butter into the body cavity and cover all surfaces with some oregano, basil, garlic, Dill, salt and pepper. Then wrap the foil and seal it and pop it on the grill for an hour and they would be delicious. That is the only way that I can say I have enjoyed these fish, but they taste so good that way….

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Amberjack http://alwaysanadventure.com/adventures/amberjack/ http://alwaysanadventure.com/adventures/amberjack/#respond Tue, 25 Mar 2014 16:32:54 +0000 http://www.alwaysanadventure.com/?p=247 One of the most powerful fish I have ever caught is the Amberjack. Ann and I have caught them all over the Savannah snapper banks, the Betsy Ross reef, Hilton head reef and the naval towers off of Georgia’s coast. When we’ve talked to local fishermen about eating them, it seems it always comes down […]

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One of the most powerful fish I have ever caught is the Amberjack. Ann and I have caught them all over the Savannah snapper banks, the Betsy Ross reef, Hilton head reef and the naval towers off of Georgia’s coast. When we’ve talked to local fishermen about eating them, it seems it always comes down to the same thing – Worms!!!

It is true, amberjack, especially the larger ones, have worms in the tail. I grew up fishing for Cod with my father in the gulf of Maine, so worms are nothing new. Cod, particularly later in the season, have worms in the meat as well. It just comes with the fish. All is not lost though!! When we used to bring a cooler of Cod home, we would filet them all and then pull the skin off. Once this was done, we could hold the filet up to a light and see the worms coiled inside the meet. Sometimes you could see the worms right at the surface, other times they were a bit deeper in the meet and you could just see a red spot where they were. In either event, the worms could be removed by sticking the tip of a filet knife in the center of them, (they were always curled up into a circle) and pulling them out.

This same technique works on the Amberjack and I’ll tell you right now, that the Amberjack is a great tasting fish. It has very firm flesh that has a light taste to it and it is great whether it is fried, broiled, or baked. It is good on the grill and my wife has a recipe for smoking it to make a type of fish dip that is unbelievable.

If you get the chance to enjoy the awesome fight of an Amberjack, don’t pass up on trying a top quality fish because of a few worms that are easily disposed of.

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